People and water – perspectives on past and present relationships via hydrology, palaeohydrology and archaeology

Workshop,  June 15 2017

Organised by Kevin Walsh (Fellow IMéRA-EURIAS 2016-2017 ; Senior Lecturer in Landscape Archaeology, University of York, UK) in collaboration with Peter Cook (IMéRA Fellow 2016-2017 ; Professorial Research Fellow, School of Environment, Flinders University, Adelaide Australia)

In collaboration with Peter Cook, I organised a one-day international workshop that took place at IMERA on 15 June 2017.

The rationale and aims of the workshop were as follows:
Both hydrologists and anthropologists/archaeologists are interested in how hydrological systems have changed over time. Hydrological interpretation can benefit from information on how human-stresses on hydrological systems have changed over time, and anthropological and archaeological studies can benefit from information on hydrological change (which can be both a cause and an effect of anthropological change). In this one-day conference, we brought together a group of hydrologists, palaeohydrologists, and archaeologists. Within this group of disciplines, we wanted to assess and question disciplinary boundaries and consider data-integration: For example, to what extent do hydrologists consider time-depth and to what extent does palaeohydrological research inform contemporary hydrological models. Moving on from this, how do hydrologists and palaeohydrologists incorporate evidence relating to changes in human activities, practices, behaviour, and the related forms of environmental knowledge that change over time. All of these issues, discussing the ways in which hydrological, palaeohydrological and historical disciplines intersect, is of paramount importance for discussions of Anthropocene trajectories. Continuer la lecture de « People and water – perspectives on past and present relationships via hydrology, palaeohydrology and archaeology »